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  • Ner a Car

    https://hackaday.com/2016/04/07/1921...remanufacture/

    A vintage oddity from the past. some may like it.

  • #2
    Nice. I'd try it out.

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    • #3
      They are very stable. Anyone who has been to Paris in the last 2 or 3 years will have seen one riding around the fair grounds, owned by Dave from the Headwaters section.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ex Pat View Post
        They are very stable. Anyone who has been to Paris in the last 2 or 3 years will have seen one riding around the fair grounds, owned by Dave from the Headwaters section.
        That Ner-a-Car was restored and used for many years by Ed Olesen in the CVMG, also known for his restorations of several 4 cylinder Danish Nimbus motorcycles.

        The Ner-a-Car is a bit of a mystery in Antique motorcycling. While, according to the serial numbers on existing bikes, over 9000 were made in the US factory in Syracuse, New York (1922-1926) and over 4,000 produced in Britain by Sheffield-Simplex (1922-1927). But very few seem to have survived. While a clever, patented and novel design, it had some rather unconventional features such as a twistgrip clutch, friction drive, a 6 speed "geared" hand lever transmission and the hub centre steering where the handle bars and front wheel turned at different amounts. The one I rode many, many years ago was certainly quite stable over a chewed-up fairground track, but its acceleration was about as quick as the bloom of a "century plant" and its top speed only in the Ford Model T class (30-35 mph) which was perhaps OK when it was designed about 1917-18, but not enough for the 1920s when lightweight (250cc class) motorcycles were good for 45-55 mph top speeds. The American ones started out with a 211 cc 2-stroke engine and later ones upped it to 285cc, but it was obviously not enough motor. The later British ones used a 250 or 350 cc 4 stroke engine to try to boost sales but there was a lot of competition in the British market from more conventional, and cheaper, makes.
        While "Cannonball" Baker rode one across the USA in a demonstration test and claimed to only have used $20 worth of fuel, that was not enough to ensure commercial success.
        All in all, it was one of those designs for the "Everyman (or Woman)" who wanted convenient, reliable and economical transportation rather than a rip-snorting, high speed, thrilling motorcycle. It was 20+ years (and a world war) later before the Vespas and Lambrettas came along to fill that niche.
        AFJ

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        • #5
          Ahh yes. "Near-A-Car but Never-A-Car"

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